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2006 ARP Conference

Information         Call For Papers         Abstracts         Program

 ART OF RECORD PRODUCTION
Second Annual Conference, Edinburgh, 8-10 September 2006

  Program of Events

FRIDAY 8 SEPTEMBER   

Registration

St Cecilia’s Hall 4.00pm

5.00pm

Introduction to the ARP Conference 2006 (Simon Frith, Edinburgh University)

Launch of the Journal of the Art of Record Production
(Katia Isakoff, West Focus, and Simon Zagorski-Thomas, London College of Music, TVU)  

Announcement of ARP Conference 2007


6.00 pm

Keynote Address: JOE BOYD


BUFFET  SUPPER


A Concert of Iranian Santoor music performed by Saeed Niakowsari of the Saba Institute, Shiraz, Iran.

SATURDAY 9 SEPTEMBER

Alison House


9.30-11.00am

Producing Classical Music

Timothy Warner (University of Salford):  ‘Listening for Phi: representations of temporal proportion in recordings of Mozart’s Piano Sonatas’

Simon Frith (University of Edinburgh): ‘Making sense of classical record production’


Producing Dance Music

Hans Zeiner-Henriksen (University of Oslo): ‘The Most Significant Beat. A comparative study of changes in bass drum sounds in dance music from 70s disco to electronic dance music of the 1980s and 1990s’

Anne Danielsen (University of Oslo): ‘Interaction of rhythm and sound in contemporary dance music’


Producing Country Music

Mike Jarrett (Pennsylvania State University): ‘Plato in Nashville: record production and ethics’

Nathan Adan Adam and Brady Barnett (Middle Tennessee State University): ‘The times they are a changin’: the impact of digital editing techniques on modern Country Music’


Case Studies in Experimental Production 1


Tommy Harrison (Jacksonville University) : ‘The role of the artist/producer: Hendrix and Electric Ladyland’

Mark Irwin (London College of Music, TVU): ‘“Brown shoes don’t make it …” Frank Zappa’s production techniques’


TEA & COFFEE


11.30-1.15pm

Matters of Practice 1

Paul Borg (London College of Music, TVU): Mixing ‘Ceasefire’

Mike Alleyne (Middle Tennessee University): ‘Nile Rodgers: production beyond the Chic mystique’


In the studio 1

Thomas Porcello (Vassar College): ‘“So what kind of sound are you after here?”  Speech-about-sound in the recording studio context’

Andy East (London College of Music, TVU): ‘“Can you hear me in your desperate’s?”  Communication in the recording studio’


The History of Recording 1

Saeed Niakowsari (Saba Institute, Tehran): ‘Forgotten attempts at recording a sound: a Persian perspective’

Paul Fischer (Middle Tennessee University): ‘The Sooy dynasty of Camden, New Jersey, Victor’s First Family of Recording’


Independent Recording

Philippe Le Guern (University of Angers) and Hugh Dauncey (University of Newcastle): ‘Independent record labels and the local sphere: a comparative study of two cities, Angers, France and Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK’


LUNCH


2.30-4.30pm

Case Studies in Experimental Production 2


Kyree Tromm Linvig (University of Oslo): ‘The pop song: sound, ontology and text’ (on Kraftwerk)

Rupert Till (University of Huddersfield): ‘Mixing experimental and popular musics with reference to the Chillage People’


The History of Recording 2


Richard Osbourne (London Consortium): ‘Disc vs Cylinder in early recording’

George Brock-Nannestad (Patent Tactics, Denmark): ‘The lacquer disc for immediate playback—professional recording and home recording from the 1920s to the 1950s’



Panel Discussion: What is the Role of the Studio in the 21st century


Paul Baxter (Delphian Records), Graeme Duffin (Foundry Studios), Paul Savage (Chem 19 Studios)


St Cecilia’s Hall


TEA & COFFEE


5.00pm
   
Studio communication—the practitioner’s’ view

Joe Boyd, Mike Howlett (Music Producers Guild), Richard Burgess (Smithsonian Folkways), Paul Borg (London College of Music)


6.00pm

Plenary Presentation: Paul Thèberge (Carleton University, Ottawa)

Glenn Gould Remixed: the Engineer as Archaeologist


Sunday 10 September

 

Alison House


9.30-11.30am


Matters of Theory

Becky Shepherd (University of New South Wales): ‘Representations of sound: the role of production in the artistic formation of sound in popular musical forms’

François Ribac (University of Metz): ‘From the scientific revolution to popular music.  A sociological approach to the analysis of recording technology’

Tellef Kvifte (University of Oslo): ‘Analog revolution in digital technology’


Matters of Practice 2

Justin Paterson (London College of Music, TVU): ‘Killing spillage’

Michael Worthington (Southern Cross University): ‘Contemporary trends in 5.1. Music mixing’


In the Studio 2

Kent Walker (McGill University, Montreal): ‘Breaking through the glass: communication scenarios in music production’

Rob Toulson (Anglia Ruskin University): ‘A need for universal definitions of audio terminologies and improved knowledge transfer to the consumer’

Mike Hajimichael (Intercollege, Cyprus): ‘The desk, the glass and the mic: the layers of communication, culture and music production’


TEA & COFFEE


12.00-1.15pm


Matters of Practice 3


Gerard Moorey (Bath Spa University): ‘See hear: the aesthetic spectacle of record production’

Nick Prior (University of Edinburgh): ‘OK computer: mobility, performance and the laptop producer’


Producing Meaning


Helen Reddington (University of Westminster): ‘Creation and re-creation: a sense of place versus “being there”’

Mike Howlett (London College of Music, TVU): ‘“The same old song”: reflections on creating cultural meaning through popular music production techniques’


Producing music outside the First World


Jan Fairley (Institute of Popular Music, Liverpool) and Alexandrine Fournier (University of Manchester): ‘Music studios and aesthetics in Revolutionary Cuba’

Simon Zagorski-Thomas (London College of Music, TVU): ‘Functional staging through the use of production: techniques in late 20th Century African and Cuban popular music’


TABLED PAPERS

Martha De Francisco (McGill University, Montreal): ‘How does it sound—what do they hear? Reflections on recording aesthetics and listeners’ reactions’

Peter Doyle (Macquarie University, Sydney): ‘Living large: the field recording, the mug shot and the early C20th mediascape’’